Midnight at the Electric by Jodi Lynn Anderson beings with Adri, preparing to leave her life on Earth behind to be part of the new colony on Mars, in the year 2065. Staying with a cousin she didn’t know she had (Lily, who’s 107, with an even older tortoise named Galapagos), she discovers an old letter and journal in the house. From there the reader is ushered into Catherine’s story, which takes place during the 1930s Dust Bowl, which connects to Lenore’s story, just post WWI.

While it is  part science fiction and part historical fiction (and even throws in a bit of mystery – I mean there’s a 150+ year old tortoise living on a farm in Kansas, there has to be some sort of story to that), but really none of those things is the focus (and it will probably be disappointing if you are looking for either). Anderson’s novel is about it’s characters, and their connections to each other and the places they come from, and deciding how to move forward. A book that touches on the failures that brought about catastrophes (global warming, dust, war) and also the hopefulness and need to survive that is part of being human.